A review of the role of dipyridamole in treating COVID-19.

Key Messages

Dipyridamole belongs to the class of antiplatelet drugs, and also inhibits the activity of two enzymes called phosphodiesterase 3 & 5 (PDE3 and PDE5), which play a role in the organ damage caused by COVID-19.

A number of clinical and experimental studies have shown dipyridamole has broad-spectrum antiviral properties.

By suppressing inflammation and free-radical production, dipyridamole may also protect against progressive fibrosis which can damage the kidneys, heart, and liver.

This article presents evidence for the use of dipyridamole as a drug to protect against major COVID-19 complications including acute kidney injury, acute respiratory distress, and acute liver injury.

PLANT ARCHIVES

Publication Date: March 1, 2021
Peer Reviewed: Yes
Publication Type: Review/Commentary/Letter
DOI: https://www.doi.org/10.51470/PLANTARCHIVES.2021.v21.S1.341

A REVIEW ON THE THERAPEUTIC POTENTIAL OF DIPYRIDAMOLE IN THE TREATMENT OF COVID-19

Ankit Sharma, Gagandeep Singh Shergill, Mukta Gupta

Abstract

Dipyridamole (DIP) belongs to the class of antiplatelet drugs and functions as a phosphodiesterase 3 & 5 (PDE3 and PDE5) inhibitor that enhances intracellular cAMP/cGMP concentrations. Besides the well-established platelet agglutination inhibition activity, DIP may offer advantageous therapeutic actions to patients suffering from COVID-19. Various clinical and experimental studies have indicated that DIP possesses broad-spectrum antiviral actions, and its administration has shown to suppress SARS-CoV-2 replication in Vero E6 cells. Moreover, it has been reported that DIP suppress inflammation, possess anti-oxidative properties and enhances nitric oxide mediated cellular pathways. Experimental evidences have shown that DIP may protect acute damage and progressive fibrosis of the renal, cardiac, and hepatic tissues. Here we provide evidence advocating DIP as a possible therapy against major COVID-19 complications such as acute kidney injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and acute liver injury encompassing the pieces of evidence directly from DIP